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A Key to Understanding Traditional Chinese Medicine

Introducing Two Resource Books

Whether you are a herbalist or a health food store owner, or a health practitioner who wants to help your customer understand the increasingly popular traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulas, or you are just one of those health conscious people who want to take your health care into your own hands, and make sensible choices and taking advantage of the reliable and time honored TCM products Chinese have used for centuries for good health, you do not want to miss this opportunity to learn the basics of TCM including the seemingly mystic medical theories and the outwardly exotic material medica.

Basic Theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine and The Chinese Materia Medica, are two of a set of seven that are published by China Academy Press as English-Chinese Colleagiate Textbooks in traditional Chinese medicine for institutions of TCM of higher Learning edited by Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. These books may help you do all the above and much, much more.

Ever since their publication in 1998 these two books have become a much sought after bible in traditional Chinese medicine for those non Chinese readers who are not familiar with Chinese concept of the universe, the human body, health, disease, prevention and treatment.

Do not be daunted by the fact that this set of books is designed for college use. You do not need college levels of training in physics, chemistry, math, calculus, etc which are the prerequisite courses to take before a college degree to medicine (conventional medicine, that is.) to understand. You do not have to learn Chinese language to read them because they are in both languages. If you want to learn Chinese, it is a perfect tool for you.

Is the language “Chinglish” (meaning hard coined English few can understand)? Largely, “No!” No, because a few English speakers are among the few editors whose painstaking work with their excellent knowledge of both Chinese language and Chinese culture made the books highly readable and understandable. The implied “yes” to the answer, lies in the fact that on the one hand, the two textbooks are written and edited by well-versed Chinese TCM experts including well known doctors, researchers, professors from research and teaching institutions in China, and as authentic writing for teaching, they have to be very faithful to the basic TCM tenets, including the Chinese culture-bound concepts and logics, and on the other hand, they need to be understood by English speaking readers who may not be familiar with Chinese culture. It is always a formidable task to build a flexible and no nonsense bridge between the East and the West outlooks and concepts, theories and logics. This gigantic and overwhelming mission, improved by the English editors made the set enormously interesting and fantastically rewarding for the readers.

Here are the Tables of Content for the two volumes:

Basic Theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine

Introduction

  • Development and Basic Theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Basic Theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Characteristics of Traditional Chinese Medicine

Chapter One Yin-Yang and the Five Elements

  • Section 1. The Theory of Yin-Yang
  • Section 2. The Theory of Five Elements

Chapter Two Visceral Manifestation

  • Section 1. Introduction
  • Section 2. Five Zang-Viscera
  • Section 3. The Six Fu-Viscera
  • Section 4. Extraordinary Organs
  • Section 5. the Relationships between the Zang
  • Viscera and Fu Viscera

Chapter three Qi, Blood, Body Fluid and Vitality

  • Section 1. Qi
  • Section 2. Blood
  • Section 3. body Fluid
  • Section 4. Relationship among Qi, Blood and Body Fluid
  • Section 5. Vitality

Chapter Four Meridians

  • Section 1. The Concept and Composition of the Meridians
  • Section 2. Regular Meridians
  • Section 3. The Eight Extra Meridians
  • Section 4. Divergent meridians, Collaterals, Meridian, Tendon and Skin areas
  • Section 5. The Physiology of Meridians and
  • Application of Meridian Theory

Chapter Five Etiology and Pathogenesis

  • Section 1. Etiology
  • Section 2. pathogenesis

Chapter Six Pathological Mechanism

  • Section 1. Basic pathological Mechanism
  • Section 2. The Pathological Mechanism of Exogenous Febrile Diseases
  • Section 3. The Pathological Mechanism of the Five Endogenous Evils
  • Section 4. pathological Mechanisms of the Zang-Viscera and Fu-Viscera

Chapter Seven Principles of Treatment and Prevention

  • Section 1. Prevention
  • Section 2. Principles of Treatment

Retail Price: 38.00 USD

The Chinese Materia Medica

Generation Discussion

Chapter 1. Producing Areas, collection and Prevention

Chapter 2. Theory on Drug Properties

Chapter 3. Applications of Chinese Drugs
Systematic Considerations

Chapter 1. Drugs of Relieving Exterior Syndromes

Chapter 2. Heat-Clearing Drugs

Chapter 3. Purgative Drugs

Chapter 4. Anti-Rheumatics

Chapter 5. Aromatic Drugs for Resolving Dampness

Chapter 6. Drugs for Inducing Diuresis and Excreting Dampness

Chapter 7. Drugs for Warming the Interior

Chapter 8. Drugs for regulating Qi

Chapter 9. Drugs for Removing Food Stagnation

Chapter 10. Anthelmintics

Chapter 11. Hemostatics

Chapter 12. Drugs for promoting Blood Circulation and Relieving Blood Stasis

Chapter 13. Drugs resolving Phlegm and Relieving Cough and Asthma

Chapter 14. Tranquilizers

Chapter 15. Drugs for Calming the Liver and Checking Wind

Chapter 16. Drugs for Resuscitation

Chapter 17. Tonics for Deficiency Syndromes

Chapter 18. Astringents

Chapter 19. Drugs for External Use and Others
Appendix

Retail Price: 48.00USD

A Key to Understanding Acupuncture and Moxibustion
Introducing Acupuncture and Moxibustion

If you want to learn acupuncture and moxibustion, the ancient arts of Chinese healing here is the best resource for you. Acupuncture and Moxibustion is one of a set of seven that are published by China Academy Press as English-Chinese Colleagiate Textbooks in traditional Chinese medicine for institutions of TCM of higher Learning edited by Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Ever since its publication in 1999, it is a favorite reading material for non Chinese readers who are not familiar with Chinese concept of the universe, the human body, health, disease, prevention and treatment.

Do not be daunted by the fact that this set of books is designed for college use. You do not need college levels of training in physics, chemistry, math, calculus, etc which are the prerequisite courses to take before a college degree to medicine (conventional medicine, that is.) to understand. You do not have to learn Chinese language to read them because they are in both languages. If you want to learn Chinese, it is a perfect tool for you too.

Is the language “Chinglish” (meaning hard coined English few can understand)? Largely, “No!” No, because a few English speakers are among the few editors whose painstaking work with their excellent knowledge of both Chinese language and Chinese culture made the books highly readable and understandable. The implied “yes” to the answer, lies in the fact that on the one hand, the two textbooks are written and edited by well-versed Chinese TCM experts including well known doctors, researchers, professors from research and teaching institutions in China, and as authentic writing for teaching, they have to be very faithful to the basic TCM tenets, including the Chinese culture-bound concepts and logics, and on the other hand, they need to be understood by English speaking readers who may not be familiar with Chinese culture. It is always a formidable task to build a flexible and no nonsense bridge between the East and the West outlooks and concepts, theories and logics. This gigantic and overwhelming mission, improved by the English editors made the book enormously interesting and fantastically rewarding for the readers.

Here is the Table of Content for the volume:

Introduction
Part I: Meridians and Points
Chapter 1 A General Introduction to the Meridians

  • Section 1 Development of the Theory of Meridians
  • Section 2 The composition of the Meridian system
  • Section 3 The Gen, Jie, Biao, Ben, Qijie and the Four Seas of the Meridians
  • Section 4 Physiological Functions of the Meridians System and Clinical application of the Theory of the Meridian
  • Section 5 The Courses of the Twelve Regular Meridians and their principal Symptoms
  • Section 6 The Course, principal Symptoms and Crossing Acupoints of the Eight Extra Meridians
  • Section 7 Acupoints, Courses, Principal Indications and Treatment of Fifteen Collaterals

Chapter 2 An Introduction to Acupoints

  • Section 1 The Essential Concept of Acupoints
  • Section 2 The Development and Classification of Acupoints
  • Section 3 The Nomenclature of Acupoints
  • Section 4 Properties of Acupoints
  • Section 5 The Concept and Classification of Specific Points
  • Section 6 Methods of Locating Acupoints

Chapter 3 The fourteen Meridians’ Acupuncture Points and the Extraordinary points

  • Section 1 The Acupuncture Points of Lung Meridian
  • Section 2 The Acupuncture Points of Large Intestine Meridian
  • Section 3 The Acupuncture Points of Stomach Meridian
  • Section 4 The Acupuncture Points of Spleen Meridian
  • Section 5 The Acupuncture Points of Heart Meridian
  • Section 6 The Acupuncture Points of Small Intestine Meridian
  • Section 7 The Acupuncture Points of Bladder Meridian
  • Section 8 The Acupuncture Points of Kidney Meridian
  • Section 9 The Acupuncture Points of Pericardium Meridian
  • Section 10 The Acupuncture Points of Triple Energizer Meridian
  • Section 11 The Acupuncture Points of Gallbladder Meridian
  • Section 12 The Acupuncture Points of Liver Meridian
  • Section 13 The Acupuncture Points of Governor Vessel
  • Section 14 The Acupuncture Points of Conception Vessel

Chapter4 ExraordinaryPoints

  • Section 1 Region of the Head and Neck
  • Section 2 Points in the Region of the Chest and Abdomen
  • Section 3 Points in the Region of the Back and Lumbar
  • Section 4 points in the Region of the Upper and Lower Extremities
  • Part II Acupuncture and Moxibustion Techniques

Chapter 1 Filiform Needle

  • Section 1 The Structure and Specification
  • Section 2 Needle Practice
  • Section 3 Preparations Prior to Acupuncture Treatment
  • Section 4 Manipulation
  • Section 5 management of Possible Accidents
  • Section 6 Precautions in Acupuncture Treatment

Chapter 2 moxibustion

  • Section 1 Classification of Moxibustion
  • Section 2 moxibustion with Other Materials
  • Section 3 Precautions
  • Section 4 Contraindications of moxibustion
  • Section 5 management After Moxibustion

Chapter 3 Other Acupuncture Therapies

  • Section 1 The Three-Edged Needle
  • Section 2 The Cutaneous Needle
  • Section 3 The Intradermal Needle
  • Section 4 Electro-Acupuncture
  • Section 5 Hydro-Acupuncture

Chapter 4 Nine Needles in the Ancient Times and the Methods Listed in Internal Classic

Chapter 5 Scalp Acupuncture

Chapter 6 Ear Acupuncture

Part III Acupuncture and Moxibustion Treatment

Chapter 1 introduction

Chapter 2 Acupuncture Therapy

  • Section 1 Internal diseases
  • Section 2 Gynecological and Pediatric Diseases
  • Section 3 External Diseases
  • Section 4 Diseases and Syndromes of the Eye, Ear, Nose, Throat and Mouth

Retail price: 45.00USD

Diagnostics of Traditional Chinese Medicine

This is one of the English-Chinese Colleagiate Textbooks in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Institutions of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Higher Learning edited by Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Diagnostics of TCM is a study concerning the examination of body, diagnosis f diseases and differentiation of syndromes under the guidance of the basic theories of TCM.

TCM diagnostics include examining patient, collecting data relating to health, sorting out, analyzing, synthesizing and reasoning the data on the basis of basic theories of TCM, and finally determining the characteristics of clinical manifestations and the way of health change when diseases occur. So correct diagnosis is the prerequisite for effective treatment and prevention.

During the long period of medical practice, doctors of TCM have accumulated very rich experience in diagnosis making TCM diagnosis a unique and comprehensive diagnostic system.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1 Introduction

  • Section 1 the Main Contents of Diagnostics of TCM
  • Section 2 The Principles of Diagnosis in TCM
  • Section 3 Brief History of TCM Diagnostics

Chapter 2 Observation

  • Section 1 Observing Vitality, Color, Figure and Posture
  • Section 2 Local Observation
  • Section 3 Observation of Excreta
  • Section 4 Tongue Observation
  • Section 5 Modern Research on Observation

Chapter 3 Auscultation and Olfaction

  • Section 1 Auscultation
  • Section 2 Olfaction

Chapter 4 Interrogation

  • Section 1 The Purpose and Method of Interrogation
  • Section 2 Contents of Interrogation

Chapter 5 Palpation

  • Section 1 Pulse Examination
  • Section 2 Body Palpation
  • Section 3 Modern Research on Pulse Reading

Chapter 6 The Eight Principles of Syndrome Differentiation

  • Section 1 Syndrome Differentiation on the Yin and Yang
  • Section 2 Syndrome Differentiation on Exterior and Interior
  • Section 3 Syndrome Differentiation on Cold and Heat
  • Section 4 Syndrome Differentiation on Deficiency and Excess
  • Section 5 Modern Research on the Eight principles of Syndrome Differentiation

Chapter 7 Etiological Syndrome Differentiation

  • Section 1 Six Evils
  • Section 2 pestilential Evils
  • Section 3 seven Emotions
  • Section 4 Improper Diet and Overwork
  • Section 5 parasites and Surgical Trauma

Chapter 8 Qi, Blood and Body-Fluid Syndrome Differentiation

  • Section 1 Qi Syndrome Differentiation
  • Section 2 Blood Syndrome Differentiation
  • Section 3 Syndrome Differentiation of Both Qi and Blood
  • Section 5 Syndrome Differentiation of Body Fluid
  • Section 6 Modern Research on Qi, Blood and Body-Fluid Syndrome Differentiation

Chapter 9 Visceral Syndrome Differentiation

  • Section 1 Syndrome Differentiation on Liver and Gallbladder
  • Section 2 Syndrome Differentiation on Heart and Small Intestine
  • Section 3 Syndrome Differentiation on Spleen and Stomach
  • Section 4 Syndrome Differentiation on Lung and Large Intestine
  • Section 5 Syndrome Differentiation on Kidney and Urinary Bladder
  • Section 6 Syndrome Differentiation on Compound Visceral Syndromes
  • Section 7 Modern Research on Visceral Syndrome Differentiation

Chapter 10 Meridian Syndrome Differentiation

  • Section 1 Syndromes of the Twelve Regular Meridians
  • Section 2 Syndromes of the Eight Extra meridians

Chapter 11 Syndrome Differentiation of Exogenous Diseases

  • Section 1 The Six Meridian Syndrome Differentiation
  • Section 2 Wei-Qi-Ying-Xue ( Defense-Qi-Nutrient-Blood) Syndrome Differentiation
  • Section 3 triple-Jiao Syndrome Differentiation

Chapter 12 Medical Record

  • Section 1 The Attentive Items for Writing Medical Record
  • Section 2 The Content of Medical Record

Retail Price: 39.00USD

Formulas of Traditional Chinese Medicine

This is one of the English-Chinese Colleagiate Textbooks in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Institutions of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Higher Learning edited by Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

A formula is a combination of herbs targeted to certain diagnosed disease used upon properties of the herbs used and the need of the problem. One of the advantages of using a compound formula over a single herb, is that herbs are used not only to achieve desired synergetic effects but also to counterbalance toxins and side effects of other herbs. According to statistics there are more than a million formulas available for practitioners, and practitioners may adapt the formula to the aimed disease by making certain changes.

Formulas in this book is the major ones used for a long time. They are classified into different categories for practical treatment or prevention of certain diseases.

 

Table of content
Introduction

Part One

Chapter One The Relationship of Formulae to Syndrome Differentiation and the Establishment of Therapies

  • Section 1 The Relationship of Formula to the Syndrome Differentiation
  • Section 2 The Relationship of Formula to Establishment of Therapy
  • Section 3 Common Regulations for Designing Formula

Chapter Two Design of Formula

  • Section 1 Structure of Forming a Formula
  • Section 2 Modification of a formula

Chapter Three Classification of Formulae

Chapter Four Preparations of Formulas

Chapter Five administration of Formulae

  • Section 1 The Method of Decocting Herbs
  • Section 2 Methods of Oral Administration
  • Section 3 Methods of External Application

Part Two Elaboration

Chapter One Exterior- relieving Formulae

  • Section 1 Formulae for Relieving the Exterior with Pungent-Warming Herbs
  • Section 2 Formulae for relieving the Exterior with Pungent-Cool Herbs
  • Section 3 Formulae for Relieving the Exterior by Strengthening the Genuine

Chapter Two Purgative formulae

  • Section 1 Cold Purgative Formulae
  • Section 2 Warm Purgative Formulae
  • Section 3 Moistening Purgative Formulae

Chapter Three Digestive Formulae

Chapter Four Mediative Formulae

  • Section 1 Formulae for Mediating Shaoyang
  • Section 2 Formulae for Harmonizing the Liver and Spleen
  • Section 3 Formulae for Regulating Gastrointestinal Tract

Chapter Five Heat-Clearing Formulae

  • Section 1 Formulae for clearing Heat from the Qi Stage
  • Section 2 Formulae for Clearing the Nutrient Stage and Cooling Blood
  • Section 3 Formulae for Clearing Heat and Poison
  • Section 4 Formulae for Clearing Visceral Heat
  • Section 5 Formulae for Clearing Summer-heat
  • Section 6 Formulae for Clearing Away the Deficient Heat

Chapter Six Interior Warming Formulae

  • Section 1 Formulae for Warming the Middle to Dispel Cold
  • Section 2 Formulae for Restoring Yang to rescue Collapse
  • Section 3 Formulae for Warming Meridians to Expel Cold

Chapter Seven Tonic Formulae

  • Section 1 Formulae for Tonifying Qi
  • Section 2 Formulae for Tonifying Blood
  • Section 3 Formulae for Tonifying Both Qi and Blood
  • Section 4 Formulae for Tonifying Yin
  • Section 5 Formulae for Tonifying Yang

Chapter Eight Stringent Formulae

  • Section 1 Formulae for Consolidating the Exterior to Stop Sweating
  • Section 2 Formulae for Astringing the Lung to Alleviate Cough
  • Section 3 Formulae for Consolidating the Intestine to Cease Diarrhea
  • Section 4 Formulae for Consolidating the Essence to Control Emission and Enuresis
  • Section 5 Formulae for Uterine Bleeding ad Vaginal Discharge

Chapter Nine Sedative Formulae

  • Section 1 Sedative Formulae with Heavy Herbs
  • Section 2 Sedative Formulae with Tonic Herbs

Chapter Ten Formulae for Resuscitation

  • Section 1 Cold- Natured Formulae for resuscitation
  • Section 2 Warm-Natured Formulae for Opening Orifices

Chapter Eleven Formulae for Regulating Qi

  • Section 1 Formulae for Activating Qi
  • Section 2 Formulae for Lowering the Adverse Flow of Qi

Chapter Twelve Formulae for Regulating Blood

  • Section 1 Formulae for Promoting Blood Circulation to Remove Stasis
  • Section 2 Formulae for Arresting Bleeding

Chapter Thirteen Formulae of Eliminating Dampness and Diuretic

  • Section 1 Formulae for Drying Dampness and resolving the Turbidity
  • Section 2 Formulae for Clearing Away Heat and Excreting Dampness
  • Section 3 Formulae for Inducing Diuresis to Remove Dampness
  • Section 4 Formulae for Warming and Resolving Water-Dampness
  • Section 5 Formulae for Diuresis by Purgation
  • Section 6 formulae for Expelling Wind and Dampness

Chapter Fourteen Formulae for Eliminating Phlegm

  • Section 1 Formulae for Drying Dampness and Resolving Phlegm
  • Section 2 Formulae for Clearing Away Heat and Resolving Phlegm
  • Section 3 Formulae for Moistening Dryness and Resolving Phlegm
  • Section 4 Formulae for Warming and Resolving Cold-Phlegm
  • Section 5 Formulae for Dispelling Wind and Resolving Phlegm

Chapter Fifteen Formulae for Wind

  • Section 1 Formulae for Dispelling Exogenous Wind
  • Section 2 Formulae for Stopping Endogenous Wind

Chapter Sixteen Formulae for Dryness

  • Section 1 Formulae for Dispersing Exogenous Dryness
  • Section 2 Formulae for Nourishing Yin to Moisten Dryness

Chapter Seventeen Parasite-Expelling Formulae

Chapter Eighteen Emetic Formulae

Appendix One Index of Formula Names

Appendix Two Pinyin-English Cross Reference of Formula Names

Retail Price: 45.00USD

Traditional Chinese Internal Medicine

This is one of the English-Chinese Colleagiate Textbooks in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Institutions of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Higher Learning edited by Beijing University of raditional Chinese Medicine. It is a bridge course between basic theories and clinic practice.

In its long history of development TCM accumulated a very large body of knowledge on internal medicine including etiology, pathology, taxonomy and therapeutic methods. Internal medicine is a discipline to systematically deal with internal diseases by using principle of diagnosis and treatment based on an overall analysis of the illness and the patient’s condition under the guidance of TCM theory. Its extensive contents mainly consist of two major types of diseases, seasonal diseases caused by exogenous factors and miscellaneous diseases due to internal disorders.

 

Table of Content
General Discussion

Chapter 1 The Development of Traditional Chinese Internal Medicine

Chapter 2 The Basis of Traditional Chinese Internal Medicine

  • Section 1. Etiology
  • Section 2 Pathology
  • Section 3 Taxonomy
  • Section 4 Therapeutics

Chapter 3 Methods of Clinical Practice and Writing of Medical Record in Traditional Chinese Internal Medicine

  • Section 1 Method of Clinical Practice in Traditional Chinese Internal Medicine
  • Section 2 General requirements for Traditional Chinese Internal Medicine Record
  • Section 3 Written Form and Contents of In-patient Internal Medicine record
  • Section 4 Written Forms and Contents for the First Medical record of Internal Outpatient

Systematic Considerations

  • Common Cold
  • Cough
  • Bronchial Wheezing Syndrome
  • Panting Syndrome
  • Lung Distension
  • Sputum Retention
  • Spontaneous Perspiration and Night Sweat
  • Blood Syndrome
  • Palpitation
  • Pectoral Pain and Stuffiness
  • Insomnia
  • Melancholia
  • Manic and Depressive Psychosis
  • Epilepsy
  • Stomachache
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Dysentery
  • Constipation
  • Hypochondriac Pain
  • Jaundice
  • Accumulation and Aggregation
  • Tympanites
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Apoplexy
  • Edema
  • Stranguria
  • Retention of Urine
  • Diabetes (Xiao Ke)
  • Arthralgia
  • Wei (Atrophy) Syndrome
  • Fever Due to Internal Disorders

Prescriptions (Index) in the Book

Retail Price: 75.00USD